STANWOOD insights

Book review: How Will You Measure Your Life? - Clayton M Christensen , James Allworth , et al.

Oct 22, 2019 9:52:34 AM / by Hannes Kleist

Our head of catering Hannes, reviews the books he reads.

This week Hannes read a a book on life's success and long term fulfilment.

Not the best read. A bit shallow.

Section I Finding Happiness in Your Career

If you want to help other people, be a manager. If done well, management is among the most noble of professions.

I really like that sentiment.

Section II Finding Happiness in Your Relationships

Investing our time and energy in raising wonderful children or deepening our love with our spouse often doesn’t return clear evidence of success for many years.

Word!

I can lose myself in one [task] for hours; solving it will give me a short-term “high.”

That's flow tasks for you. Unfortunately this will not make you great.

Intimate, loving, and enduring relationships with our family and close friends will be among the sources of the deepest joy in our lives.
93 percent of all companies that ultimately become successful had to abandon their original strategy.

I incorporated this into my sales pitch for MVP and Scrum. 90% of startups do not survive year one. 90% change strategy. Thus, the probability that your idea from the workshop will succeed: 1%.

Language dancing involves talking to the child about “what if,” and “do you remember,” and “wouldn’t it be nice if”—questions that invite the child to think deeply about what is happening around him. And it has a profound effect long before a parent might actually expect a child to understand what is being asked.

Will try that more.

Some working-poor people talked a lot to their kids and their kids did really well. Some affluent businesspeople talked very little to their kids and their kids did very poorly.

Talking about schools...

The two fundamental jobs that children need to do are to feel successful and to have friends—every day.
Resources are what he uses to do it, processes are how he does it, and priorities are why he does it.

Nice framework on "What is management"?

Heading down a path of outsourcing more and more of your role as a parent, you will lose more and more.

Yeah. Spent time with your kids - instead of outsourcing those tasks to coaches and trainers.

The theory of capabilities suggests they need to be challenged. They need to solve hard problems. They need to develop values. When you find yourself providing more and more experiences that are not giving children an opportunity to be deeply engaged,

I already try to live by "if they can do it, they need to do it". i.e. I won't help the boys to dress anymore.

I need to find a book or something with challenging stuff for them to do.

Helping your children learn how to do difficult things is one of the most important roles of a parent.

That and be liked.

Epilogue
Finally, I am a professional man. I genuinely believe that management is among the most noble of professions if it’s practiced well. No other occupation offers more ways to help others learn and grow, take responsibility and be recognized for achievement, and contribute to the success of a team.

Nice sentiment

Buy the book here